Mondays with your MD – Back-to-school Health Tips

2022-08-22T19:59:16+00:00August 22nd, 2022|Families, Family Practice, Health Care, Public Health|

It’s that time of year again! Today we can review how to help children have a successful year.

Focus on Nutrition

Packing a healthy school lunch is key for giving your child a healthy energy boost during their school day.

High protein foods (yogurt, cheese, beans, hummus) with fresh vegetables and fruits are best.

Avoid empty calories added from sugars and solid fats.

Hydrate with water. Drink the number of 8oz cups daily equal to age. (5 cups for 5 year old)

Make Sleep a Priority

Most healthy children need EIGHT TO TEN HOURS of sleep each night

Put away electronic devices at least one hour before bedtime

Encourage children to read a book before bedtime

Eating a light healthy snack before bed can be beneficial, but avoid caffeine

Learning Styles and Behaviors

Now is a good time to schedule an annual exam with your doctor

Review any questions or concerns you may have about age-appropriate behavior, developmental milestones, and learning needs that can affect your child’s ability to learn in a classroom

Vision Screening is important. If your child is squinting, tilting head and holding handheld devices too closely are just some of the signs your child may have a vision problem.

Exercise: Get Active

School age children need 60 minutes or more of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity each day

Encourage sports and outdoor activities after school

Walk or Bike to school

It is an exciting time with lots of changes to the routine. Parents play a key role in helping children make a successful transition.

Mondays with your MD – Monkeypox: Questions and Answers

2022-07-31T14:56:29+00:00July 31st, 2022|Adults, Families, Public Health, Urgent Care|

Monkeypox is caused by a virus that is usually not serious, though the rash is painful and can cause scarring.
Although a public health emergency, Monkeypox disease is not similar to COVID and no one should panic.

What is monkeypox?

Previously, monkeypox was known as a rare disease. It was first seen in humans in 1970 and caused by an infection with the monkeypox virus (a part of the same family of viruses as smallpox). The disease is milder than small pox symptoms and it is rarely fatal. Monkeypox is usually a self-limited disease that lasts 2-4 weeks.

What are the symptoms of Monkeypox?

  • Headaches
  • Muscle aches
  • Exhaustion
  • Fever
  • Sore throat, cough, congestion
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Rash

What does the rash look like?

The rash can be extremely itchy or painful and goes through different stages before forming a scab and healing. It can be located near genitals but also on hands feet and other parts of the body.

How does the virus spread?

  • Through close skin to skin contact
  • Contact with surfaces used by someone with monkeypox (shared towels for example).
  • Direct contact with rash or body fluids from someone with monkeypox.

How can I protect myself?

  • Limit contact by avoiding close skin to skin contact of persons with a rash.
  • Do not share utensils, plates, or cups with person who has monkeypox.
  • Do not handle bedding towels or cloths with person who has monkeypox.
  • Wash hands frequently.
  • The vaccine is limited and recommended for people who have been exposed to monkeypox.

Mondays with your MD – Urinary Tract Infections: Separating Fact from Fiction

2022-07-17T13:40:09+00:00July 17th, 2022|Adults, Families, Family Practice, Health Care, Urgent Care|

Urinary Tract Infections

Urinary tract infections, or UTIs, are extremely common, especially in women. Dealing with them is no fun and often requires frequent trips to the bathroom, pain when urinating, and soreness in the lower abdomen, back or sides. Many turn to at-home remedies to tackle discomfort or try to change risky behaviors to avoid a repeat infection.

Unfortunately, there are plenty of myths out there about UTIs that can make recognizing the causes and finding effective relief difficult.

Separating Fact From Fiction

Myth #1: Taking AZO for my UTI is “Good Enough”

Although AZO may provide symptomatic relief, it can often mask underlying symptoms and delay seeking appropriate medical care.  In addition, it can cause discoloration of urine making the infection more difficult to detect on examination.

Myth #2: Tampons Cause UTIs

Some women think tampons make them more prone to developing UTIs since tampons are placed inside the body, while other feminine hygiene products are kept outside of the body. However, tampon use may be even more effective at preventing UTIs than pads. Tampons can keep the area dryer, leaving less of a chance for bacteria to flourish and cutting down on the risk of infection.

Myth #3: Cranberry Juice Will Cure My UTI

The cranberry juice cure is one of the most commonly believed myths about treating UTIs. However, don’t for a minute think that a bottle of cranberry juice can replace a visit to your doctor or proper medication. It turns out cranberry juice isn’t nearly as effective as many people think.

Though some studies have demonstrated potential ability to prevent (not treat) symptomatic UTIs, there isn’t sufficient data to support routinely recommending it.

Myth #4: Only Women Get UTIs

Women definitely get UTIs more often than men. This is because the urethra, the duct that carries urine out of the body, is shorter in women, allowing bacteria to more easily reach the bladder. However, this is still a myth, as men can and do get UTIs. UTIs are more common in men who have not been circumcised and suffer from other medical issues including incontinence, prostate cancer or urinary tract stones.

Myth #5: Sex Causes UTIs

This one is both a myth and a fact. The real myth lies in the belief that only sexually active women get UTIs. Sex can definitely play a role, though, as bacteria near the vagina can inadvertently get into the urethra during sexual contact. Urinating after sex is CRUCIAL because it will allow your body to flush out vaginal bacteria that tends to get pushed into the urethra during sex.

Does this mean that abstinence is a sure-fire way to protect yourself from UTIs? Think again. In fact, women are most at risk for getting UTIs while pregnant or experiencing menopause or perimenopause. This is due to the change of hormones in the urinary tract during these times.

Talk to your doctor about UTI symptoms and appropriate treatment.

Mondays with your MD: Formula Shortage

2022-06-25T21:22:11+00:00June 25th, 2022|Families, Family Medicine, Public Health|

Formula Shortage

Recently I had a patient reach out to let me know she was unable to locate the formula she routinely provided to her baby. She let me know she was considering feeding her baby with breastmilk from a friend and was concerned about allergens in some of the other formula products.

Nothing is as important to families as the health and safety of their babies. The formula shortage has left many anxious about how to feed them. My guess is that many are thinking about a similar solution. I thought I would share a few recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

RECOMMENDATIONS

  • Consider trying a brand new formula
  • Consider trying a formula made in another country
  • Talk to your physician about substitutes for hypoallergenic or specialty forumulas (as was the case in the above example)

OPTIONS for HOW to FEED YOUR BABY SAFELY

  • Consider discussing using whole cow’s milk if baby is over 6mo
  • If baby is close to one year discuss with physician options for toddler drinks
  • Consider using local milk bank

AVOID these options

DO NOT share breast milk with friends or purchase on the internet. There are significant infectious disease and storage safety risks

DO NOT water down formula

DO NOT make it at home

DO NOT use expired formula

If you are having difficulty finding formula and solutions please reach out to your physician.

Mondays with Your MD: Skin Cancer Awareness Month

2022-05-22T17:59:05+00:00May 15th, 2022|Community, Families, Family Medicine, Special Offer|

Summer is almost here…. and with it comes lots of outdoor activities. Protecting your skin from the sun is imperative. Did you know that skin cancer is the most common type of cancer?

skin-cancer-prevention-facts

The good news is that skin cancer can be prevented and it can almost always be cured… when it’s found and treated early.

Simple Skin Cancer Prevention Tips:

-Seek the shade between 10am-4pm
-Do NOT get a sunburn
-Use broad spectrum sunscreen SPF 30 or higher and reapply after 2hours
-Examine your skin once a month

 

Subscribe to our newsletter to learn more and get FREE SKIN CANCER SCREENING

Subscribe to our monthly newsletter “Health Tips”

Resuming COVID-19 Testing

2022-01-11T14:40:34+00:00January 9th, 2022|Adults, Coronavirus, Covid-19 Testing, Families, Pandemic, Uncategorized|

>> CLICK HERE TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT <<

As the number of COVID cases again increases, we are aware that reliable testing has become difficult to obtain. At Roots Health DPC, we have chosen to resume COVID testing for the community to ensure everyone who needs a test has access. We offer PCR testing (and rapid testing for those with symptoms as well). This service continues to be available and free of charge for our members. We will now make it available to the public (non-members) with discounted pricing for testing of families. We remain committed to the health of our community.

COVID-19 TESTING – Education and Information

2021-05-08T12:49:53+00:00December 13th, 2020|Adults, Community, Coronavirus, Covid-19 Testing, Families, Pandemic|

 

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW TO KEEP YOURSELF AND YOUR LOVED ONES SAFE

We all want quick COVID test results, understandably. But what we need are accurate results.  The worst-case scenario for my patients would be a false sense of security from a negative test when they, in fact, have COVID-19 and could harm the ones they love.  This is why public education around testing and results is so important.

At Roots Health DPC, we are committed to sharing information about COVID testing so that you can make informed decisions regarding testing and results.  Not all tests are created equal.  Below, we review what tests are used to detect whether someone has an active COVID infection, when additional testing might be necessary, and best practices for our patients when it comes to “rapid testing.”  

Types of COVID-19 Testing:

The most accurate, “gold standard” test for clinical diagnostic detection of COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) is Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) more commonly known as “PCR testing”.  Other tests are available and include rapid point-of-care (POC) molecular test and the POC antigen tests.  POC tests, commonly known as “rapid tests,” have a higher probability of missing an active infection and it may be necessary to confirm rapid negative test results with a PCR test.

When might it be necessary to confirm a negative rapid test result with a PCR test?

In certain instances, a negative test result in a rapid test should be followed up by a PCR test.  For example, if the result of the rapid POC test is inconsistent with the patient’s symptoms.  In other words, if a patient has active COVID symptoms but receives a negative result, that person should proceed to PCR testing.

There are other instances when it is recommended to proceed to PCR confirmation of a negative rapid test.  For example, when you have been exposed to a known positive case for more than 15 minutes within 6 feet it is recommended to obtain testing.  If your rapid test is negative, PCR confirmation would be best practice.   

Given what we know about the decreased accuracy of rapid testing, what are the most appropriate uses for rapid testing? 

Rapid testing is extremely useful when it is positive.  However, it will not change the plan for the patient.  Patients who are symptomatic and positive will be instructed to isolate for a minimum of 10 days from the onset of symptoms while they are contagious to others.  Patients who are asymptomatic but have had a “close contact” exposure will be instructed to quarantine for 14 days from the date of exposure.   

Rapid testing may be an appropriate test for those who have no symptoms and no exposure.  For example, some people are required to obtain a negative COVID-19 test prior to travel.    

Roots Health DPC is committed to providing accurate COVID-19 testing information to you and your loved ones.

There are many different tests being offered with a constantly changing landscape of locations and availability.  We understand that this can be overwhelming. It is our hope that this resource can help you navigate what type of test is best for you and your loved ones.  Wherever you choose to test, please makes sure you know what type of test is being offered and have your questions answered before testing.  

At Roots Health DPC, we currently offer PCR testing with a return time of 48-72 hours.  All persons who test with Roots Health DPC are provided relevant and clear CDC recommendations including information on what to do while waiting for your test result, understanding the difference between quarantine and isolation, understanding how to manage COVID-19 symptoms at home, and learning how best to prevent the spread in your home if you have COVID-19.

If we can be of service or answer any questions, please feel free to reach out to us directly at 708-613-7916.  

>>Click here to schedule a COVID-19 test<<

>>LEARN MORE ABOUT ROOTS HEALTH DPC<<

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