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Prediabetes – What is it exactly?

2023-01-31T00:36:36+00:00January 30th, 2023|Adults, Diabetes, Family Medicine, Family Practice, Health Care, Membership|

What is prediabetes? Who is at risk?
A look at the myths about diabetes.

Approximately 96 million American adults—more than 1 in 3—have prediabetes. Of those with prediabetes, more than 80% don’t know they have it. In fact, most people are not aware that they should be routinely screened.

So what is the harm in having prediabetes?

Prediabetes significantly increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. As with anything… knowledge is power.

The good news is that if you have prediabetes, which is easily detected on bloodwork, you can make lifestyle changes to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and other serious health problems.

Is prediabetes more common than you thought?
Learn more about ways that you can maximize your wellness by setting up a FREE initial consultation with Dr Diaz to create a customized health plan based on your personal wellness goals.

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Today we are going to dispel some common myths about Diabetes.

Myth: You’re not at risk for Diabetes if you’re a healthy weight

Being obese or overweight is associated with a number of health problems, and it increases your risk for type 2 diabetes. This does not mean that you are immune to the disease if you maintain a healthy weight, however. Even people at a healthy weight can have diabetes

Myth: No One in My Family Has Diabetes, so I Can’t Get It

Having a close family member with type 2 diabetes does put you at increased risk for developing the condition. But the risk of diabetes goes up with age. The risk is higher in people with heart disease, high blood pressure, and who have excess weight or obesity, regardless of family history. Although you might not be able to change your family history or age, you can practice a healthy lifestyle to cut your risk.

Myth: There’s Nothing That You Can Do to Prevent Diabetes

Even though genetics factor into your risk for type 2 diabetes, lifestyle choices play an important role in preventing diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight, daily exercise and healthy diet modifications can help reduce your risk for diabetes. Smoking can make it difficult for your body to use insulin, so not smoking can help decrease your risk for diabetes, as well. Alcohol consumption can also play a role.

Myth: It’s Your Fault if you have Diabetes

Diabetes is a serious chronic disease, and people with diabetes are not to blame. There is no known way to prevent type 1 diabetes, and while lifestyle factors do contribute to your risk for type 2 diabetes, even type 2 diabetes is not entirely preventable.

Myth: Diabetes is Inconvenient but not Serious

Diabetes results in more deaths than breast cancer and AIDS put together. There are several risks and complications associated with diabetes, including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney failure, and lower limb amputation that impact the quality of life significantly.

Next week we will take a look at how you can figure out your risk for prediabetes and determine what type of screening is appropriate.
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Habits: Directing Your Life Intentionally

2023-01-23T04:18:54+00:00January 22nd, 2023|Adults, Membership, Mental Health, Public Health|

Our brains are the most amazing organ. The brain organizes and integrates an incredible amount of data quickly while allowing us to operate on “auto-pilot” for much of our day. Our brains create systems and pathways that are so well worn that we can do routine tasks without shifting our focus to them.

How can we harness the strength of this amazing gift to help us create the life we want? By understanding how to intentionally form our habits

So… what is a habit?

Habits are behaviors we perform on a regular basis where some component of the behavior is considered “automatic.” Forming new habits just requires practice.

Developing new desired healthy habits is something we can direct our brain to do for us. Dr Diaz works with patients to help them build habits and reach their goals.

>> Learn more aT: Roots Health DPC <<

Habits are pathways in the brain that have formed through repetition. The repetitive pattern starts with a cue from the environment which triggers a behavioral response and is reinforced with a reward. The classic example was the experiment with Pavlov’s dogs where the dogs salivated (behavior) in response to the bell (cue).

In order to create a new, healthy habit—or even to break a bad habit—you’ll want to be as intentional as possible with all three parts: cue, behavior, reward. You can manipulate your environment to introduce cues that you can then intentionally start to associate with a desired behavior and reinforce it all with a reward.

Changing your life habits can be simpler than you may think. With a few tricks, you can gain or lose any habits you’d like.

Understanding these tips will help you stick to healthy habits and break bad ones as you work toward your health and wellness goals in 2023.

FOCUS ON THE CUE

In order to create new habits, we need to focus on the cue, NOT the behavior.

Let’s say you want to start practicing yoga on a regular basis. Instead of focusing on doing yoga, try focusing on developing the routine around initiating the yoga.

An easy way to do this is to choose a cue that already occurs regularly in your daily life, such as drinking morning coffee. During the early stages of developing your yoga habit, focus your effort on prepping your yoga space while you brew the coffee. Then go fill up your cup and go straight to the location in your home you have chosen to do yoga.

Develop the habit of prepping to do yoga every morning, which makes it more likely that you’ll actually do it. Do not focus on the behavior… you can start with 5 minutes daily of yoga and gradually build up to your targeted time.

After a while, you’ll start to notice that when you get up to get coffee (environmental cue), it takes little to no effort to set up your space and practice yoga (habitual response).

You’ll even start to look forward to it, and maybe even feel like something in your life is off when you do not practice yoga…. And that’s the power of habit!

REINFORCE WITH THE “REWARD”

Using the yoga example, you might get done and treat yourself to a (healthy) snack to go with your coffee. Whatever you do, be sure to incorporate a healthy reward into your habit routine.

The more often the cue, behavior, and reward occur in close time and proximity to one another, the stronger a habit becomes.

HEALTHY HABITS TO START RIGHT NOW

All habits are not created equal. Some habits can have positive impacts across multiple areas of our lives. The most impactful habits are ones that point you toward regular exercise, eating well, and getting good sleep. These three are my top picks for unlocking a healthier life starting today.

HABITS VS GOALS – Don’t confuse habits with goals.

Goals are great, but putting habits in place that move you toward your goals are key. The goal is the destination and the habit is the journey.

You have the tips you need to build healthy habits and break bad ones. Start the process today and build a better life for yourself…. one habit at a time. Interested in learning more about how you can use habits and achieve your health and wellness goals? Set up a FREE “Meet and Greet” to speak with Dr Diaz today. Space is limited.

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Making Health Your Priority in 2023: Tips for Success

2023-01-22T20:41:04+00:00January 16th, 2023|Adults, Community, Family Practice, Health Care, Membership, Mental Health|

The goal of becoming healthier is among the most popular resolutions. Many resolve to eat healthier and exercise regularly. These resolutions are great, but they do not address the way stress can sabotage our best efforts to live a healthy life. Emotional well-being underpins our success at achieving our health goals for 2023.

Goal setting is good, but the mindset work that builds the foundation for the path to success is what is most important. Living a healthy life is a journey, not a destination, and there are no “quick cures” when it comes to health and well-being. Failure can cause impatience and it is necessary to remember that you will succeed… if you don’t expect overnight success.

>> Learn more about Roots Health DPC <<

At Roots Health DPC we provide a system and support to ensure that you achieve your health and wellness goals. We know that healthy living is the foundation for a successful happy productive life.


Use these tips to help ensure you follow through with prioritizing your health in 2023:

Stay in Touch

Connect with friends in person. It’s good for your health to maintain friendships. In general, a lack of social bonds can damage your health as much smoking, obesity, and high blood pressure.

Surround yourself with people who are making their personal health and wellness their priority. In a technology-fixated era, it’s never been easier to stay in touch, so fire up your favorite social media and then follow up with in-person visits.

Plan for bumps in the road: A support system can help. We thrive with social interaction and support. Surround yourself with like-minded people looking to prioritize their health and wellness this year. It is important to have someone there on a regular basis to get you through those rough times.

Manage Your Stress

Stress, in small doses, can actually be helpful for short periods. But chronic stress can increase your risk of—or worsen—anxiety, depression, diabetes, heart disease, and more. The best way to manage stress is to control the factors you have agency over:

  • Get enough sleep
  • Exercise
  • Ensure you are eating well
  • Spend intentional time relaxing away from stressors

Relaxation, sleep, socializing, and taking vacations are things we all deserve and owe to ourselves for our health and well being in 2023. Finding healthy ways to cope with the stress in your life is imperative to your well-being.

Cut Back on Alcohol

Drinking alcohol in excess can increase risk for depression, increase memory loss, and increase hot flash symptoms in perimenopausal women. Heavy chronic drinking increases your risk for liver and heart disease, stroke, mental deterioration, and even cancers of the mouth, throat, liver, and breast.

If cutting back on alcohol to a couple of drinks per week seems to be difficult, consider reaching out for help.

Get More Sleep

You probably already know that a good night’s rest can do wonders for your ability to function on all cylinders. But sleep is more beneficial to your health than you might realize. A lack of sleep has been linked to a greater risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Aim to get quality sleep and more of it by exercising good sleep habits. These habits can include actions such as:

  • Going to bed and waking up at consistent times daily
  • Having a comfortable bedroom atmosphere (i.e., one that is dark, quiet, and relaxing)
  • Getting exercise during the day

It’s common for people to make New Year’s resolutions, but it’s also common for people to break them. Fortunately, there are resolutions you can make with ways that can help you stick to them. At Roots Health DPC, we take the time to understand your unique health goals and work with you to address obstacles to your success. We invite you to join us and let us help you achieve your health and wellness goals in 2023.

Book a free meet and greet today!

Holiday Stress – Mondays With your MD

2022-12-12T22:24:06+00:00December 12th, 2022|Adults, Mental Health, Public Health, Sleep|

Prioritize your mental health this holiday season

Tis the season of giving!

Make sure you fill your own cup first…there is nothing to give from an empty cup.

We all feel stressed from time to time during the holiday season – there are changes to routine, pressure to attend social events, shopping, cleaning, entertaining, travel, and more… that can all take a toll on our mental health.
Since the pandemic began, the loss of loved ones, financial stressors, and feelings of anxiety around the uncertainties have impacted many. It’s important to adjust at your own pace and take care of your mental wellbeing along the way.

Don’t let stress and negative thinking ruin your holidays and hurt your health.

With some practical tips, you can minimize the stress that accompanies the holidays. Heck…you may even end up enjoying the holidays more than you thought you would!

5 Tips to “enjoy more and stress less” this holiday season:

1. LOWER YOUR EXPECTATIONS
… for yourself and others! The holidays do not have to be perfect… or even just like last year. Families change and grow and so do traditions and rituals. Remember feelings are not facts and they do not last forever. Try to focus on what really matters most to you this holiday season. Acknowledge your feelings and give yourself the space and time to process them and then, when you’re ready, choose to move on.

2. KEEP YOUR ROUTINE AND HEALTHY HABITS
Don’t let the holidays become a free-for-all. Overindulgence only adds to stress.

  • Get sleep
  • Eat healthy meals
  • Avoid excessive alcohol
  • Include regular physical activity
  • Use deep-breathing exercises, meditation or yoga.

3. PRACTICE MORE SELF-CARE

Make time for yourself and take a break. Reserve spending time just for you, without distractions. Engage in hobbies that bring you joy: take a walk, enjoy music, listen to an audiobook, get a massage, let your artistic side play. This simple tip may refresh you enough to handle everything you need to do.

“You should sit in meditation for 20 minutes a day, unless you’re too busy: then you should sit for an hour” –old Zen proverb

4. SAYING “NO”
Saying yes when you should say no can leave you feeling resentful and overwhelmed. Friends, family, and colleagues will understand if you can’t participate in every activity or if you are unable to host them beyond your limits. Remember that “No” is a complete sentence. If you have an obligation that is taking more time than planned, try to remove something else from your agenda to make up for the lost time.

5. ASK FOR HELP
Reaching out for help during the holidays is one of the best things you can do. Speak with a person you trust…a friend, family member or your therapist, about your current feelings. You will discover that feeling down or stressed during the holiday season is very common. Give yourself the time you need to use tools to overcome those negative thoughts. Seek professional help if you need it. Despite your best efforts, if you find yourself feeling persistently sad or anxious, plagued by physical complaints, unable to sleep, irritable and hopeless, and unable to face routine chores… talk to your doctor or mental health professional. You are never alone.

Looking for a physician who takes the time to listen and answers all your questions? We are enrolling a limited number of new patients.

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YOUR TIME is valuable – Mondays with your MD

2022-12-05T02:37:22+00:00December 4th, 2022|Adults, Direct Primary Care, Families, Family Practice, Health Care, Membership|

YOUR TIME is the most valuable resource you have. This holiday season give yourself the gift of TIME.

You work hard to balance time between your career and your family. When one of your own has a health concern that “pops up” or just needs to be scheduled …. trying to figure out the how, where, and when to get the issue addressed can literally take hours, and even days, from your routine.

I get it. I’m a working mom and I know what it is like to balance work and family, to “carry” the mental load, and then…. to put “one more thing” on your plate. My job is to take that stress off your plate.

“My son has a sore throat and fever…. I have placed a call to his doctor’s office and am waiting for a call back….”

When you have medical concerns, the last thing you want is to pile on more stress. Let me help! My patients reach out to me, their physician, directly via text at any time of day. They get answers to the questions they have about their health immediately and can take the next steps and get back to their busy lives.

“My daughter cut open her foot. Do I take her to urgent care or ER and wait to be seen?”

No one has time to wait around for a return call from the doctor’s office for advice. You don’t have to sit in an urgent care with other contagious sick people waiting to be seen… then go back again the following week because you picked up a virus in the lobby while waiting. We take care of this without the wait!

“I am experiencing a constant feeling of being tired… but I just put off going to see the doctor because it is so hard to get an appointment and the visit takes up half my day.”

Let us make going to the doctor as easy as booking a time that works perfectly for your schedule. We even offer telemedicine so you can get care wherever you are. If you are visiting us, there is no waiting in a waiting room. Ever!

THIS IS NOT too good to be true!


Ditch the Healthcare Hassle. Give yourself the gift of Time!

Get all the health care needs for your family met with ease and grace. We know how valuable your time is and that is why we are making health care easy for families: one mom at a time.

Come and see how Direct Primary Care works….schedule a free initial consultation with us today and get all your questions answered.

>> CLICK HERE TO Book A free Meet and Greet <<

YOU DESERVE BETTER CARE

What is a Sinus Infection? – Mondays with your MD

2022-11-28T19:51:24+00:00November 28th, 2022|Adults, Colds and Flus, Direct Primary Care, Health Care|

This cold and flu season, I am getting a lot of questions about sinus infections.

So today, we are reviewing which treatments work best.

What is a sinus infection?

The sinuses, air-filled pockets in bones of the face, form the top part of the respiratory tract. A sinus infection occurs when the tissue in the sinuses swells and leads to a buildup of mucus, pain, and discomfort.

Viruses cause 9 out of 10 sinus infections in adults. Here we discuss symptoms and treatment options for Viral Sinus Infections.

Common symptoms:

Pain or pressure in your sinuses
Facial pain is a common symptom of sinusitis. You have several different sinuses above and below your eyes, as well as behind your nose. Any of these air-filled cavities can hurt when you have a sinus infection. You may feel pain in your forehead, on either side of your nose, in your upper jaws and teeth, or between your eyes

Tenderness in the face
Your face may also be tender to the touch due to the built-up pressure. This tends to occur at the bridge of the nose or under the eyes, and can occur on the forehead and cheeks.

Runny nose and postnasal drip
When you have a sinus infection, you may need to blow your nose often because of nasal discharge. This discharge comes from your infected sinuses and drains into your nasal passages. The discharge may also bypass your nose and drain down the back of your throat causing irritation or sore throat. This is called postnasal drip, and it may cause you to cough. It can also cause your voice to sound hoarse.

Sinus headaches
Persistent pressure and swelling in your sinuses can give you symptoms of a headache. Sinus pain can also cause earaches and pain in your teeth, jaws, and cheeks. Sinus headaches are often at their worst in the morning because fluids have been collecting all night long.

What can I do?

Most cases of acute sinusitis get better on their own. Self-care techniques are usually all you need to ease symptoms. In general, antibiotics are not needed and do not help symptoms (as it is usually caused by a virus anyway).

Consider the following options:

1. Pain medication
Over the counter anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen can provide relief of headache, facial pain, and sore throat if they are not contraindicated.

2. Intranasal steroid sprays
These reduce inflammation and decrease swelling in nasal passages. This can be particularly helpful for patients with allergic symptoms as well. Commonly we use fluticasone nasal spray.

3. Decongestants

These are typically Pseudophedrine or Phenylephrine. They can relieve congestion and pressure but may cause a rebound effect when stopped. There are contraindications for some patients with high blood pressure and other risks.

4. Nasal Irrigation
Using a neti pot with sterile intranasal saline is highly recommended for most. These generally provide safe and effective temporary relief.

Signs that you should seek care

Consult your doctor if you have:

  • a high persistent fever (>102F)
  • symptoms that have lasted for more than 10 days
  • symptoms that are getting worse
As always, it’s recommended that you check in with your physician when you are sick for a personalized diagnosis and treatment plan to best suit your individual needs.

Are you looking for a physician who is always available and easy to reach that will answer all your health care questions? Reach out today to schedule your FREE initial consultation with Dr Diaz. Space is limited
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Mondays with your MD – Open Enrollment is Here

2022-11-12T02:13:13+00:00November 5th, 2022|Adults, Copays, Deductibles, Direct Primary Care, Family Practice, Health Care, Membership, Prescription Costs|

The THINGS you DID NOT EVEN THINK to consider this Open Enrollment…..

How can I keep my costs low AND receive high quality accessible health care?

Every year we pay more for insurance while less and less is covered. When we attempt to use our insurance it is cumbersome and inconvenient at best. We have all experienced the frustration with the amount of time it requires to obtain what we need for our health and get it covered by insurance. Today we cover the basics and empower you to make decisions that will give you the most cost-effective way to obtain the high quality health care you deserve

The Jargon

Premium: the amount you pay every month for health insurance.
Deductible: the amount you must pay before you can get any services covered by your insurance in a calendar year. A few Caveats to the deductible: Not everything counts towards your deductible. Premiums and copays generally don’t count. Some plans have separate deductibles for prescriptions.

Copay: a fixed amount you pay for a covered expense (visits, procedures, medications, etc)
Out-of-pocket maximum: the most you might have to spend for covered services in a given year. This number is important to understand!
HDHP is a High-deductible Health Plan (HDHP): these plans offer lower monthly premiums and allow you qualify for a Health Savings Account (HSA)
HSA is a Health Savings Account: A type of savings account that lets you set aside money on a pre-tax basis to pay for qualified medical expenses.
Health Share Plans*: this is not an insurance product and offers much lower monthly premiums with low initial unshareable amount (similar to a deductible). *A cooperative where members “share” medical costs. They cover catastrophic needs (hospital stay, surgery, ER visit, etc) but are not insurance products.

What your typical open enrollment conversation is missing!!!

Smart consumers determine their out of pocket projected cost for the year and choose a high deductible plan to save on monthly premiums. Savvy consumers understand the relationship between premiums and deductibles and keep costs low by determining the most cost-effective way to lower their out of pocket-expenses over the course of the entire year.

REMEMBER HEALTH CARE DOES NOT NEED TO BE EXPENSIVE.

Direct Primary Care: The impossible Made Simple and Transparent.

Direct Primary Care (DPC) removes insurance companies from the physician-patient relationship and provides the vast majority of health care services through a low monthly fee (like a gym membership). Patients skip the hassle of traditional insurance-based care. They get more time with their physician with same day and next day appointments… all without copays or hidden fees. DPC can produce tremendous savings on out of pocket expenses when patients work with their DPC physician to find the most cost-effective appropriate health care. The enormous savings on medications, labs, and imaging often exceed the annual cost of membership.

Can you imagine if you could have easily accessible high quality health care with access to your doctor whenever you needed it AND pay less out of pocket? Have a cough and fever but dont want to go to the urgent care? ….. skip the line and the copay! Urinary tract infection while on vacation out of state?…. no problem we got you covered.

“Dr Diaz is accountable and easy to reach. I feel well taken care of and trust I am in good hands.“ – M.C.

M.C. saved 97% on her bloodwork.
Imagine getting 97% OFF… you read that right! This patient had labs with Roots Health DPC and paid $29.57. The same patient had the exact same labs billed (for the same tests) at a price of $901.24 through the same lab.

At Roots Health DPC we get it. Your health and wellness are our main goal and we are here to support our patients as they make decisions that will affect their well-being.

Open enrollment only comes once per year… make the most of it and choose the best plan to meet your health care needs.
Its your money.
Its your healthcare.
Its your choice.

If you want to learn more about how direct primary care can help you achieve your health care goals and save you money, sign up for our free guide:
Better Healthcare for a Fraction of the Price”

Mondays with your MD – Breast Cancer Warning Signs (Part 3)

2022-10-31T19:17:54+00:00October 31st, 2022|Adults, Direct Primary Care, Health Care|

The 5 signs of Breast Cancer

Breast Cancer Screening is for women without symptoms. However, if you notice

any symptoms of breast cancer you should see your doctor for an evaluation

promptly regardless of when you were last screened.

The warning signs of Breast Cancer

1. If you notice a lump that feels firm or fixed in the breast or underarm area
2. Swelling, warmth, redness or darkening of the breast skin
3. Change in the size or shape of the breast including dimpling or puckering of skin
4. Nipple retraction or change in position of nipple
5. Discharge from your nipple

 

Although the vast majority of breast cancers are found through abnormal mammograms, up to 30% of breast cancer patients present with a mass that occurs between mammograms.

This is part THREE of a THREE part series on Breast Cancer Awareness.
Read more here
Part One – Prevention
Part Two – Screening

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Mondays with your MD – Breast Cancer Screening (Part 2)

2022-10-24T04:36:18+00:00October 21st, 2022|Adults, Family Practice, Health Care, Public Health|

Breast Cancer Awareness Month – Part II: Screening

On average, one out of eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer. Do you know which screening test is best and when to start screening for breast cancer?

There is more than one type of screening test for breast cancer and there are varying recommendations from different organizations. Education with individualized planning (based on your personal risk for breast cancer) can help determine the best screening test for you.

love

Mammography is the most common screening test for breast cancer

A mammogram is a low-dose X-ray of your breasts and can find cancer early.

Different experts have varying advice for when to initiate screening and how frequently to screen average-risk women ages 40 to 49. All experts agree that at a minimum screening should occur at least every 2 years between ages of 50-74.

For average-risk women screening mammography can be performed every one to two years based on patient preference.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be used to screen women who have a high risk of breast cancer

MRI is a procedure that uses a magnet, radio waves, and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body. MRI does not use any x-rays and there is no exposure to radiation.

For women with moderately increased risk factors (based on breast density, reproductive history, and hormonal history), breast ultrasound in conjunction with mammogram or a MRI can be considered on an individual basis.

Use of MRI for supplemental screening in women with dense breast tissue has shown higher rates of detection, but there is no evidence that health outcomes are improved overall.

Women with high risk factors (based on a history of chest radiation, ancestry, genes and genetic conditions) may benefit from more frequent screening with enhanced modalities. Obtaining annual MRI and/or consultation to consider risk reduction treatment and intensification of surveillance are viable options.

It is clear that the type and timing of breast cancer screening is highly personalized. You should discuss your risk factors with your board-certified physician so that you can make an informed decision about breast cancer screening.

This is part TWO of a THREE part series on Breast Cancer Awareness.

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Mondays with your MD – Breast Cancer Awareness Month!

2022-10-17T23:16:13+00:00October 16th, 2022|Adults, Direct Primary Care, Family Medicine, Health Care, Public Health|

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Many of us have been touched by breast cancer- perhaps through a personal diagnosis- or by a family member, friend, or colleague diagnosed with this disease. Breast cancer, after all, is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and leading cause of cancer death in women. Please join me over the next few Mondays to discuss prevention, screening, and warning signs.

Education is Key for Prevention

Do you know the risk factors associated with an INCREASED risk for breast cancer?

  • Hormonal factors can influence your risk for breast cancer. Higher levels of endogenous estrogen and hormonal combined estrogen/progesterone replacement has been associated with increased risk of developing breast cancer.
  • Reproductive factors associated with a higher breast cancer risk include earlier onset of menstruation, not giving birth or having first child later in life, and a late menopause.
  • Family history and genetic mutations. The risk of breast cancer is affected by the number of first-degree female relatives diagnosed with breast cancer and the age at which they were diagnosed.
  • The highest breast cancer risk occurs among White women (although it remains he most common cancer among women of every major ethnic/racial group).
  • Alcohol consumption is associated with a higher risk of breast cancer.
  • A higher BMI in postmenopausal women is associated with increased risk for breast cancer. 

Do you know how to DECREASE your risk for breast cancer?

  • Breastfeeding. For every 12 months of breastfeeding there is an approximate 4% reduction in the relative risk of breast cancer.
  • Increased physical activity at all ages lowers risk.
  • Dietary factors may modify breast cancer risk although data is limited. Eating a low-fat high fiber diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables is recommended.

This is part ONE of a THREE part series on Breast Cancer Awareness. STAY TUNED. Next week we will review breast cancer screening options and recommendations.

 

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